Anxiety

What is anxiety?

Anxiety is a normal, if unpleasant, part of life, and it can affect us all in different ways and at different times. Whereas stress is something that will come and go as the external factor causing it (be it a work, relationship or money problems, etc.) comes and goes, anxiety is something that can persist whether or not the cause is clear to the sufferer.

Anxiety can make a person imagine that things in their life are worse than they really are, and prevent them from confronting their fears. Often they will think they are going mad, or that some psychological imbalance is at the heart of their woes. What is important is the recognition that anxiety is normal and exists due to a set of bodily functions that have existed in us from our cave-man days.

Back then, we were equipped with an internal alarm system designed to protect us from the dangers surrounding us in the wild. This system would make us hyper-alert by giving us a boost of adrenaline that would increase the heart rate and boost the amount of oxygen going to our limbs so we were better able to fight or run from danger. This is known as the “fight or flight” response. The “butterflies in the stomach” feeling that many associate with anxiety is this mechanism kicking in, but instead of being used to avoid immediate danger, it is often wrongly and inappropriately activated in a person during normal, everyday situations when stress has built up, often unknowingly.

Some people have a very identifiable cause for their anxiety; a traumatic incident, lots of stressors or have undergone a significant life event (moving house, getting divorced, having surgery). However, some people don’t have an identifiable cause for their anxiety and it causes them some distress. One way of thinking about your anxiety is to imagine your stress levels as being like a bucket of water. If we keep adding stressors to the bucket (even tiny ones like the school run or commuting to work), over time it fills up until one day it overflows. This can be a good way of looking at anxiety as it explains why sometimes it can seem to come out of the blue with no significant trigger. However, what has happened is that the trigger was just a very small stressor that tipped us over the edge and allowed our bucket to overflow. What we need is a leaky bucket with lots of holes in to reduce your overall stress levels. Each one of these holes could be something positive that you do to manage your anxiety, such as yoga, exercise, reading, listening to music or spending time with friends or family.

Symptoms

People often experience physical, psychological and behavioural symptoms when they feel anxious or stressed.

Some of the most common physical symptoms of anxiety are:

  • Increased heat rate

  • Increased muscle tension

  • “Jelly legs”

  • Tingling in the hands and feet

  • Hyperventilation (over breathing)

  • Dizziness

  • Difficulty in breathing

  • Wanting to use the toilet more often

  • Feeling sick

  • Tight band across the chest area

  • Tension headaches

  • Hot flushes

  • Increased perspiration

  • Dry mouth

  • Shaking

  • Choking sensations

  • Palpitations

Some of the most common psychological symptoms (the thoughts or altered perceptions we have) of anxiety are:

  • Thinking that you may lose control and/or go “mad”

  • Thinking that you might die

  • Thinking that you may have a heart attack/be sick/faint/have a brain tumour

  • Feeling that people are looking at you and observing your anxiety

  • Feeling as though things are speeding up/slowing down

  • Feeling detached from your environment and the people in it

  • Feeling like wanting to run away/escape from the situation

  • Feeling on edge and alert to everything around you

Treatment

Treatment often combines drugs, to alleviate the symptoms, with a therapy to get to the root cause of the anxiety.

Sourced from Anxiety UK

Self-help organisations

Anxiety UK: Helpline: 08444 775 774. Charity formed 30 years ago by a sufferer of agoraphobia for those affected by anxiety disorders.

British Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies (BABCP)

Has a UK register of accredited therapists.

No Panic: Offers support for sufferers of  Panic Attacks, Phobias, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, Generalised Anxiety Disorder and Tranquilliser Withdrawal.

 

Mental Health Foundation
Mental Health Foundation
The Royal College Of Psychiatrists